Siya Kolisi Talks About GBV While Cooking For The Fam

Siya Kolisi who is not just a rugby star, but also a great husband and father, held a powerful talk about GBV while he cooked for his family.

Siya Kolisi who is not just a rugby star, but also a great husband and father, held a powerful talk about GBV while he cooked for his family.
Siya Kolisi. Picture Courtesy Of Daneloo

Siya Kolisi who is not just a rugby star, but also a great husband and father, held a powerful talk about GBV while he cooked for his family.

Just as the lockdown has kept so many people busy working on their skills, Kolisi turned to the kitchen to hone his cooking skill. Except, the most interesting part about it is that when he did it, it turned into a powerful talk about gender-based violence (GBV) amongst other topics brought up by his fans.

The Springbok captain prepared a chicken stir fry and spaghetti while he interacted with fans who asked him questions about his family life, training tips, favourite soccer team and  favourite beer.

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Kolisi says young men must not just leave the house chores to women alone, but should always help where they can.

“I think it’s cool for us to show the younger kids there is so much more we can do during this time, and let them know this is a different generation now. We have to be able to do this stuff and help out at home, so I will try and cook as much as I can in the week,” he said.

His wife, Rachel Kolisi, later joined him and gave the meal a thumbs up.

The 29-year-old rugby star also weighed in on the protest against GBV outside parliament on Tuesday.

“People always ask why it is important for men to be there. It is because it’s us who are causing this problem. As a man, you don’t treat people like that, so that’s why I have a problem with it. If someone says they are a man and they do that kind of staff, it also reflects on me,” he said

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He shared that having grown up in an abusive household, he has had to unlearn some things and teach his younger brother different ways.

“I told my brother that I grew up seeing that and it becomes normal. That’s why I’m saying,  as men, we should be there to support. I’ve had to unlearn a lot of things. I don’t have the answers but I know this is wrong.”

Rachel said children who grow up with present fathers and in non-violent environments are privileged as these are some of the contributing factors to GBV.

 

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