Scientists Have Unlocked The Secret To The Perfect Hug

Scientists measured the calming effect of hugs of different pressures on infants, and when given by strangers compared to from parents.

Scientists measured the calming effect of hugs of different pressures on infants, and when given by strangers compared to from parents.
Mother hugging her baby. Picture Courtesy Of Classified Posts

Scientists measured the calming effect of hugs of different pressures on infants, and when given by strangers compared to from parents.

A team from Japan’s Toho University monitored the heart rates of the infant and using pressure sensors on the adult’s hand, assessing the baby’s reaction to just being held, a hug with medium pressure, and what they called a ‘tight hug’.

According to the results published in the journal Cell, babies were soothed more by a medium-pressure hug than just being held, but the calming effect decreased during a tight hug.

The researchers kept the length of the hug to 20 seconds as “it was almost impossible to avoid infant’s bad mood during a one-minute or longer hold or hug.”

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For infants older than 125 days, the calming effect was greater when receiving a hug from a parent than from a female stranger. That lead to the scientists believing that the perfect hug is considered to be medium pressure from a parent.

The scientists went on to show that infants are not the only ones who feel the benefits of a comforting hug, parents also exhibited significant signs of calmness while hugging their babies.

It is known that a hormone called oxytocin, sometimes known as the “love hormone”, is released during close physical contact, but the researchers said the time period of their hug experiment was too short for this to take place.

Hiromasa Funato, one of the researchers on the team, told the AFP that there could also be an application in the early detection of autism. “Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties in sensory integration and social recognition,” he said.

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“Therefore, our simple hug experiment might be utilised in the early screening of the autonomic function (that regulates unconscious bodily processes), sensory integration, and development of social recognition in infants with high familial risk for ASD,” the scientist concluded.

 

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Ruddy134
Ruddy134
1 year ago

I personally feel great whenever I am hugged or even hug someone, it’s a feeling everyone wants to have. But the feeling might not be there if the hug is forced. Think about it.